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  • Anatomy of a Landing Page

    Converting landing pages may differ significantly in design, but they all have the same key elements in common. The anatomy of a landing page encompasses both basic, foundational concepts (the bones) and strategic design elements that lead a person to act (the flesh).

    Converting landing pages may differ significantly in design, but they all have the same key elements in common. The anatomy of a landing page encompasses both basic, foundational concepts (the bones) and strategic design elements that lead a person to act (the flesh).

    Landing Page Bones

    Before you begin experimenting with the perfect call to action or the best product images, you need to make sure the structural bones that will support those elements are in place.

    ●      Unique value proposition

    Your unique value proposition lets the viewer know why he should buy from you and not someone else. It sets you apart by showcasing the unique characteristics that make you the best.

    ●      Offer

    Not to be confused with the call to action, your offer is the deal you’re showcasing. It might be a store-wide sale, a discount for repeat customers, or free shipping. Whatever your primary offer is, it should be obvious as soon as the visitor arrives on the landing page.

    ●      Customer Benefit

    The primary question most customers ask as they’re shopping is “What’s in it for me?” Showcasing benefits provides the answer to this question by demonstrating how life will be better, easier, or more complete with the purchase of your product or service.

    Fleshing It Out

    Once the structural bones of your landing page are in place, you can begin creating the design elements that make it unique.

    ●      Logo and tagline—Your logo and tagline give the viewer a sense of context and let him know who he’s dealing with.

    ●      Headline—Landing page headlines need to accomplish two things:

    ○    The email or PPC ad started a connection with your visitor and your headline needs to continue and reinforce that connection. For example: if your offer in the email or PPC ad was to find out more about European Vacations – your landing page headline needs to talk about European Vacations and not about vacationing in the South Pacific

    ○    Entice the visitor to read the first paragraph of your copy – The headline needs to engage the mind of the visitor. The purpose of your headline is to get the visitor to read your first sentence.  The purpose of the first sentence is to get the reader to read your first paragraph…and so on throughout your copy. Your headline can make or break your landing page’s effectiveness. Spend as much time on it as you spend writing your copy.

    ●      Images—Include a photo of the primary product or service you’re offering and consider adding thumbnail shots showing additional products included in the sale or other views of your primary product.

    ●      Call to Action—Generally, a single call to action is best, although you may want to include a secondary, less demanding call to action that allows the viewer to take action without committing whole hog.

    ●      Copy—Well-written copy should answer the viewer’s questions, provide product specs, and persuade him to take advantage of your offer. The amount of copy will vary depending on your offer and it’s complexity. You don’t want to have too little so that the visitor doesn’t have enough information to be able to make a decision. You also don’t want to have too much, where the offer is sold, the visitor is ready to sign up, and the copy takes off again, repeating what has been said previously. Test your copy to come up with the amount that is “just right” for your visitors.

    ●      Navigation—While you may not want to include full-scale navigation, it’s better to keep the reader on your website by giving him a few options rather than losing him altogether if he decides not to buy.

    As you design your landing page, experiment with the presentation of these structural and design elements in order to showcase the unique aspects of your company, but remember that the best landing pages will be simple, straightforward, and persuasive.

    —–

    Marty Diamond is one of the owners of Diamond Website Conversion. If you are a small businesses owner who wants convert more of their existing traffic into sales or leads, they can show you how to maximize the value of every visitor by optimizing your website for conversion.

    Filed Under: Tech/E-Commerce

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    About the Author: Marty Diamond is a conversion optimization specialist. She shows small businesses how to get more leads and sales from their website’s existing traffic. Find out more about Marty at DiamondWebsiteConversion.com . You can also connect with her on Google Plus at +martydiamond.

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