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  • The Effective Executive Part 1

    Effective executives focus on outward contributions. They gear their efforts to results rather than to work. They start by asking, “What results are expected of me?” rather than the work to be done, let alone its technique and tools.

    Peter Drucker, the Austrian-Hungary born management guru, consultant an author, lends his best expertise about executives, in his seminal book, The Effective Executive. This is the first part of our examination.

    1.      Men of high effectiveness are conspicuous by the absence in executive jobs. High intelligence is common enough among executives. Imagination is far from rare. The knowledge levels tend to be high. But there seems to be little correlation between a man’s effectiveness and his intelligence, his imagination or his knowledge.

    2.      Effective executives know where their time goes, the work systematically at managing the little of their time that can be brought under their control.

    3.      Effective executives focus on outward contributions. They gear their efforts to results rather than to work. They start out with the question, “What results are expected of me?” rather than the work to be done, let alone its technique and tools.

    4.      Effective executives build on strengths-their own strengths, organizational strengths; they do no start out with what they cannot do.

    5.      Effective executives concentrate on the few major areas where superior performance will produce outstanding results. They force themselves to set priorities and stay with their priority decisions.

    6.      Effective executives, finally, make effective decisions; they know or put together the right steps in the right sequence.

    7.      Alfred P. Sloan (former heal do General Motors) never made a personnel decision the first time it came up. He made a tentative judgment, and even that took several hours as a rule. Then a few days or weeks later, he tackled the question again, as if he had never worked on it before. Only when he came up with the same name two or three times in a row was he willing to go ahead.

    8.      One of the highly effective men I know keeps two lists-one of the urgent and one of the unpleasant things that have to be done-each with a deadline. When he finds his deadlines slipping, he knows his time is again getting away from him.

    Good luck.

    Calvin Wilson
    Founder and CEO
    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals
    calvin.wilson1@verizon.net
    http://twitter.com/Upstart__Nation

    Filed Under: Management

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