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  • Rave Reviews for “Radar”

    Many new smartphones try to mimic the look of the iPhone; the HTC Radar 4G, mercifully, does not. The Radar is a sleek, silver-on-white eye-catcher of a phone. It’s proof that it’s possible to get an attractive, functional smartphone for $99.

    THE CAPTAIN GADGET 5-PARAGRAPH REVIEW OF:
    The HTC Radar 4G From T-Mobile

    (1.) Too many new smartphones try to mimic that elongated black-box look of the iPhone; the HTC Radar 4G, mercifully, does not. Available exclusively on T-Mobile (and what a shame it is that customers on other networks don’t have the option to try it), the Radar is a sleek, silver-on-white eye-catcher of a phone. A small part of its visual appeal is Windows Mango, the beautiful operating system still unfamiliar to most everyone who doesn’t work for Microsoft. The Radar doesn’t look like all the other chocolate bar smartphones, which means more attention for the person who pulls it out of his or her pocket. Let us hold up the Radar as proof that handset manufacturers can still draw up a smartphone that is not a flattened black brick. Let us also hold it up as proof that it is possible to get a nice, attractive, functional smartphone for $99.

    (2.) The Radar is light in the hand — it almost feels fragile or empty-ish on the insides, to its minor detriment — and rounded-smooth on the corners. It is a palpably well-built phone, front and back. The only physical buttons are a lock-screen button on top of the phone (same positioning as the iPhone’s), a long volume bar on the right side and a Microsoft-mandated camera button below that. The screen never really showed the smudge of my fingerprints, though the white face-plate did catch mysterious small black smudges, probably from the dyes of my clothes, on occasion. One minor point of hardware annoyance: The lock-screen button, on the top right of the phone like the iPhone’s lock-screen button, was recessed too far inwards, making it more difficult than it should have been to lock/unlock/power off. Pop it out on the second-gen, HTC.

    Read Full Article in Huffington Post.com

    Good luck.

    Calvin Wilson
    Founder and CEO
    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals
    calvin.wilson1@verizon.net
    http://twitter.com/Upstart__Nation

    Filed Under: Tech/E-Commerce

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