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  • Putin’s Back: Seems Like He Never Left

    VLADIMIR PUTIN’S announcement that he will return to the Kremlin as Russia’s president after next March’s presidential election should not have come as a surprise. Everything Russia’s prime minister has done over the past few months—from creating his “People’s Front” (a largely rhetorical device for hoovering up supporters) to posing on a Harley-Davidson—pointed in that direction.

    VLADIMIR PUTIN’S announcement that he will return to the Kremlin as Russia’s president after next March’s presidential election should not have come as a surprise. Everything Russia’s prime minister has done over the past few months—from creating his “People’s Front” (a largely rhetorical device for hoovering up supporters) to posing on a Harley-Davidson—pointed in that direction.

    Dmitry Medvedev, on the other hand, has been bending over backwards to demonstrate his loyalty to Mr Putin (who is nominally his inferior). For this, Russia’s acting president has been rewarded with an offer to become prime minister.

    The news will have left many Russians feeling humiliated. The job swap makes a mockery of the notion of Russian democracy. Even the 600 deputies from the ruling United Russia party who filled a massive sports arena to hear Saturday’s announcement must have felt like extras in a farce when Mr Putin told them that he and Mr Medvedev had hatched their plan several years ago.

    This seemed confirmation that Mr Medvedev’s presidential term was simply a device to keep Mr Putin in power without formally breaking the letter of the constitution, which barred him from running in the 2008 election because he had already served two consecutive terms as president. To Mr Putin’s credit he managed to do what almost nobody thought possible: to find a protégé who would keep his seat warm without trying to usurp it.

    Moreover, it was Mr Medvedev who initiated the constitutional change that lengthened presidential terms from five to six years, paving the way for Mr Putin to occupy the Kremlin for another 12 years from March.

    Read Full Article in Economist.com

    Good luck.

    Calvin Wilson
    Founder and CEO
    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals
    calvin.wilson1@verizon.net
    http://twitter.com/Upstart__Nation

    Filed Under: Global Business

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    About the Author: The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science and technology. The Economist's website can be found at http://www.economist.com.

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