• Home
  • Management
  • Startup/Entrepreneur
  • Gamechangers
  • Tech/E-Commerce
  • Career
  • Global Business
  • Women's Business

  • Another School Year: What Will Be Different?

    The first day of school: some in their last year of high school, others their very first day of school ever.

    This morning I saw the excitement – the electricity and anxiety of the first day of school for many of New York City’s school children. I have to admit, it was nice to see the process unfold: some in their last year of high school, others their very first day of school ever.

    But there is also another side to this morning: what won’t be happening, but should be happening.

    Why are America’s school children walking into class with the same plan, processes and output measurements as last year: I thought we were incensed with last year’s plan – – with the outcomes that were extrapolated from those measures, and here we are going full-boar into the same things again – troubling — derelict?

    I see children, sometimes with their parents, who really don’t know how difficult it will be for them to compete on a global stage. Why hasn’t the American educational system done better to identify and educate our children toward the technological and engineering careers that will keep innovation crisp and metastisizing — the same careers that will help the United States stand alone atop the global stage long into the future?

    There’s lots of blame to go around: but my criticism is for an unlikely player in this debacle – parents. I too often hear the positions of teachers, administrators, unions and even government officials, but the most silent partner in this crisis has been the parents. The parents haven’t assembled a movement that meets and supersedes the needs of their children, which places every child on a path to college or some form of self-sufficiency: there’s no one, who needs or deserves this undertaking more than families and communities of the working poor and very poor.

    Americans are now quite accustomed to disruptions in technology – in communications, yet we haven’t had a progressive, actionable and measurable disruption in our education system for some time – can’t remember what it is or when it happened – but the results are not bearing out tremendous optimism or progress.

    I know, you will mention, Charter Schools. I believe in the measures and dynamism of charter schools, yet too many of them have their pick of the best students, from the most engaged families – that’s eighty percent of the battle – that’s not a solution – that’s an ideal situation —  a situation that is  a direct contrast to the one that most other school children and parents face. We need effective and results-driven standards for all U.S. school children, not just the prepared and ready. We have to find replicable ways to prepare and upright, those most ill-equipped to learn: it might be our convenience not to do so now, but the consequences are too destabilizing and long-term to ignore – take a look at most minority communities, especially the young men – those are the consequences of convenient learning — those are the results of many lives lost, before they’ve even started, which is spiritually and morally abhorrent.

    I am hoping that we start to have the right conversation: one that insightful and proactive parents lead – one that is not co-opted by union bosses and legislators – one that puts children, their education and their “now’s” and futures first. I also hope that we start to identify and aggregate the best practices from all educational forms: Montessori, Religious and Home Schooling– let’s shake it up and point toward something amazing– and execute like hell until we get the results we need – not just test scores – but more worldly young people, who can look at their existence through autonomy, selflessness, ambition, collaboration and value.

    For once I want us to consider our children’s needs, before our own, and I hope they have an amazing first day today.

    Good luck.

    Calvin Wilson
    Founder and CEO
    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals
    calvin.wilson1@verizon.net
    http://twitter.com/Upstart__Nation

    Good luck.

    Calvin Wilson
    Founder and CEO
    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals
    calvin.wilson1@verizon.net
    http://twitter.com/Upstart__Nation

    Filed Under: Gamechangers

    Tags:

    About the Author:

    RSSComments (0)

    Trackback URL

    Leave a Reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.