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  • Libya’s Moment

    Has Libya ever thought of itself as a democratic nation: will it have the leadership, the pluralism and the willingness to integrate the entire country within this freedom, or will it become partisan to those most powerful parties left standing, after the fall of Qaddafi?

    Maybe the time has come for something so revolutionary that the people of Libya can smell and taste freedom: it’s close and they know it. It’s just time to close the deal.

    This is the second hardest part of the revolution: the part where you actually have to force out the power that’s been in power: sometimes a power that is the only one generations of Libyans have ever know. Those with power fight hard, until they know their moment is lost, so Libyan rebels must appear bigger than Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, because the rest of the country is watching – still hesitant,  waiting to select a side as its own – either the side that might force consequences if it survives or the one that might avail freedom that is brand new.

    The hardest part is after the leader is gone – what now?

    Has Libya ever thought of itself as a democratic nation: will it have the leadership, the pluralism and the willingness to integrate the entire country within this freedom, or will it become partisan to those most powerful parties left standing, after the fall of Qaddafi?

    In the New York Times article, Rebel Forces Invade Qaddafi Compound, it stated, “The struggle to a impose a new order on the capital presents a crucial test of the rebel leadership’s many pledges to replace Colonel Qaddafi’s bizarre autocracy with the democratic rule of law, and it could have consequences across the country and throughout the Arab world.

    Unlike the swift and largely peaceful revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, the Libyan insurrection was the first revolt of the Arab Spring to devolve into a protracted armed struggle, and at times threatened to descend into a civil war of factions and tribes.

    A rebel failure to deliver on their promises of justice and reconciliation here in the capital could spur Qaddafi loyalists around Libya to fight on. And an ugly outcome here might discourage strong foreign support for democracy movements elsewhere.

    For now, governments throughout the West and the Middle East welcomed the rebels’ victory and pledged to assist them in the transition. The Iraqi government announced Tuesday that it had recognized the Transitional National Council as the legitimate government of Libya. The European Union said on Monday that it had begun planning for a post-Qaddafi era, and Turkey’s foreign minister, Ahmet Davutoglu, flew to Benghazi on Tuesday and met with the rebel leader, Mustafa Abdel-Jalil.”

    I hope that Libya doesn’t let it’s moment slip through its fingertips: the worst thing for Libya – is a Qaddafi that at the end of the day – is waiting for an opening to be resurrected.

    Good luck.

    Calvin Wilson
    Founder and CEO
    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals
    calvin.wilson1@verizon.net
    http://twitter.com/Upstart__Nation

    Filed Under: Global Business

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