• Home
  • Management
  • Startup/Entrepreneur
  • Gamechangers
  • Tech/E-Commerce
  • Career
  • Global Business
  • Women's Business

  • To Save The Dodgers: Sell The Dodgers

    The Dodgers are not only falling on hard times: hard times are starting to look for the Dodgers.

    The Los Angeles Dodgers are not only falling on hard times: hard times are starting to look for the Dodgers.

    Such a proud, great franchise – what happened?

    Frank McCourt happened.

    The Dodgers had one of the highest valuations in all of Major League Baseball, yet a few days ago, McCourt filed for bankruptcy: the Los Angeles Dodgers are in bankruptcy.

    There has been evidence of the McCourt family issuing themselves loans against the equity of the team, not to improve the infrastructure of the stadium or to improve performance on the field – but to finance a super luxurious lifestyle, which ended in divorce – and now that divorce has the Dodgers as the crown jewel of a hyper-contentious settlement, which has thrown the organization into chaos.

    The dodgers are in big trouble and the person who got the team in trouble in the first place: is now trying to save the team — not going to happen. Major League Baseball Commissioner, Bud Selig, has already stepped in and taken over the team temporarily, and he must now do so again permanently. Dodger fans are not showing up to games and the team is underperforming, yet there is a solution.

    Force McCourt to sell the team.

    He doesn’t have the liquidity to operate the team, nor does he have the focus to do so, so the way forward should start and end with finding a potential buyer for the team:, a buyer with a vision, who wants to serve the fans of Los Angeles, by putting a champion on the field.

    This nightmare is not about the Los Angeles Dodgers, not about winning – not about tradition – not about an already good business model: it’s about greed and ego. McCourt figured that he could get even richer and more importantly, famous, by using the Dodgers as a chip. McCourt wanted to be star outfielder Matt Kemp: he should have wanted to be Bill Neukom, owner of the world champion and very profitable San Francisco Giants.

    I wanted to briefly touch on this, so Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals members will understand that when we get to positions of leadership – even our personal affairs have consequences on others, and sometimes we can lose sight of this. Understand the totality of a situation, and if you don’t – don’t move forward. I don’t think Frank McCourt wanted to be a baseball man: I think he wanted to be a big star in the land of stars.

    Good Luck.

    Calvin Wilson
    Founder and CEO
    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals
    Calvin.wilson1@verizon.net

    Filed Under: Gamechangers

    Tags:

    About the Author:

    RSSComments (0)

    Trackback URL

    Leave a Reply

    You must be logged in to post a comment.