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  • Before Leaving Your Job–

    Workers may be scrambling for a fresh start, but career experts warn that you are more often remembered for your exit than your tenure. Advice on how to walk away with pride—while avoiding the dangerous traps that will trip you up.

    Upstart: Career

    More than one-third, or 36%, of workers plan to leave their jobs in 2011, according to a recent study by insurance provider MetLife. The recession ravaged employee allegiance, and now less than half of all employees report “very strong loyalty” to their current companies. Workers may be scrambling for a fresh start, but career experts warn that you are more often remembered for your exit than your tenure.

    “With each job change you are leaving a trail of opinions,” says career coach and author John McKee. “Those opinions could build a solid reputation that helps in securing future jobs, or they could result in negative comments that could kill a great job opportunity. How you behave towards the end can greatly impact your reputation.”

    In Pictures: 10 Dos And Don’ts Of Leaving A Job

    From handling the breakup speech to turning over the reins, career coaches offer advice on how to walk away with pride—while avoiding the dangerous traps that will trip you up.

    Softening The Blow
    “Resigning is typically an emotional time for all people impacted,” says Steven Raz, co-owner of recruitment firm Cornerstone Search Group. Oftentimes, managers take a resignation personally and react unpredictably because of the surprise, says Raz. It becomes especially critical for the exiting employee to remain steady, offer a concise explanation for the departure and show appreciation for the mentorship without giving false hope of reconsidering.

    In February, Jack Williams, 45, decided to leave his operational position at Staffing Technologies in Atlanta, Georgia, for his “dream job,” as a division president at nearby Jackson Healthcare. When he gave his two weeks’ notice in person, his manager, the company’s CEO, was initially upset and disappointed, demanding that he stay on for eight weeks instead. Williams explained very simply why he was leaving and that such a long transition was both unrealistic and unnecessary. After presenting a detailed transition plan, both the CEO and CFO trusted that he was committed to a smooth changeover and were able to wish him well.

    While you can’t control others’ reactions, preparing yourself and controlling your own is essential to easing the confrontation.

    Read More:

    http://blogs.forbes.com/jennagoudreau/2011/04/25/what-to-do-before-leaving-your-job/

    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals

    Filed Under: Career

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