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  • Study For A European MBA

    Keeping their students competitive in this new global economy has become a focus for European business schools in recent years. They’ve inaugurated new courses in international business and have rolled out a growing number of foreign study opportunities and internships in places ranging from China and India to South America and Silicon Valley.

    Upstart: Global Business

    B-schools in Europe are setting up partnerships and satellite campuses in Asia and the Mideast to give students a jump in global business.

    Globalization has clearly arrived. The total value of world trade in exports has doubled in the last decade, to $16 trillion in 2009. A full 10 percent of China’s total exports now land on the shelves of Wal-Mart (WMT) stores. And the Japanese earthquake and tsunami have disrupted supply chains worldwide.

    Keeping their students competitive in this new global economy has become a focus for European business schools in recent years. They’ve inaugurated new courses in international business and have rolled out a growing number of foreign study opportunities and internships in places ranging from China and India to South America and Silicon Valley.

    Already, three major European B-schools have opened satellite campuses in other countries. France’s INSEAD, which pioneered the practice, now has facilities in Singapore and Abu Dhabi, where students can spend some or all of their MBA enrollment time. French rival HEC has a new campus in Qatar, while Spain’s IESE has opened a New York satellite. Virtually all other European B-schools have established academic affiliations around the world; Rotterdam’s RSM Erasmus, for instance, offers its students semester-long exchange programs with more than 100 leading B-schools in Europe, Asia, and the Americas.

    Why admit students to a European MBA program, only to see them off to distant locales? The point of globalizing management education is to keep up with the reality of business. Barcelona’s IESE is launching a new, first-year course called Globalization of Business Enterprise. Its goal is to give students “a framework for thinking systematically about the cultural, administrative, political, geographic, and economic differences across countries and how they affect business decisions,” says Pankaj Ghemawat, who developed the course as professor of strategic management at IESE.

    http://www.businessweek.com/globalbiz/content/mar2011/gb20110317_680254.htm

    Upstart: Business and Management for 20-40 Year Old Professionals

    Filed Under: Global Business

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