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  • How To Handle A Notice Clause

    Lengthy notice clauses are highly unusual, and employers would be hard-pressed to find employees who are willing to agree to staying on six months after they have quit or been told they are being terminated.

    Q: I am considering leaving my current job, but I have a six-month notice clause and so does my employer. Should I abide by this or not? Will I really be expected to stay the full six months?

    A: In today’s economy, lengthy notice clauses are highly unusual, and employers would be hard-pressed to find employees who are willing to agree to staying on six months after they have quit or been told they are being terminated.

    You will want to be careful about how you negotiate your departure since you already agreed to the six-month term, say the experts. Usually, clauses like these are put in place because you, the employee, have access to sensitive financial information about the company, says Randy Hain, managing partner of Atlanta-based Bell Oaks Executive Search. If you leave before your contract is up, you open yourself up to the possibility that your employer will take you to court for money damages or a court order to bar you from client contact, says Mr. Hain. “But this rarely happens,” he says. “It generally isn’t worth the time or money for the organization.”

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    A better approach would be to wait until after you give your notice to see what the employee offers and to discuss your options for leaving, suggests Mr. Hain. “In my experience, an organization doesn’t want an employee hanging around who doesn’t want to be there. It can have an effect on the morale of remaining staff and be a generally uncomfortable working situation,” he says. “You and your employer may be able to settle on a compromise that works in the best interest of both parties. You never know if you don’t ask.”

    Read More:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704739504576068013274917854.html?mod=WSJ_Careers_CareerJournal_4

    Upstart: Business and Management for 29-40 Year Old Professionals

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